Archive | May, 2013

Buddha Nature

8 May

Road to Spiritual Freedom

Here is a beautiful story.

In Northern Thailand there was a statue of the Buddha. In artistic terms, it was nothing special; not very well adorned, plain, and made of clay. But it was a holy object, and it stood for over 500 years with generations of monks carefully tending it. Then, in the early 20th century, this statue was moved to make way for a new temple. Underestimating the weight of the statue, the crane brought in to lift it dropped it, and some of the clay was chipped away. The monks hurriedly covered the statue to protect it from the elements. Late that night, a monk who believed the statue was divine entered under the tarp with a flashlight and began inspecting the damage. When he shone his light into a crack in the clay, he exclaimed in loud surprise. For what he saw reflecting back at…

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Zen vs. Yoga?

4 May

A Way in the Woods

Zen and Kundalini Yoga: A Contradiction?

I shared some of my favorite Kundalini mantra music with a Buddhist friend the other day. He loved it, but then gingerly asked whether I “consider it to be compatible with Buddhism”. He asked about the music, but he was really asking about the paths, in general. “Maybe I should just forget about all that and just enjoy it for what it is”, he then mused. And did I have any thoughts?

Of course, I did. And he already knew the answer—”you said it”, I told him. “You should absolutely enjoy it because only the dualistic mind sees a difference. All paths are one and truth is truth”.

I have another Buddhist friend, a musician, who grew up with gospel. To my best knowledge, he would never consider shunning this inspirational music that he loves so much just because it’s Christian. What an idea!…

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Buddhism and Yoga: Where the Paths Cross

4 May

A Way in the Woods

 

Phillip Moffitt, Anna Douglas, Stephen Cope and Sarah Powers

We asked a panel of people who practice both yoga and Buddhism how the two can work together.

In the forests of Vedic India, pupils gathered around teachers who instructed them in the path of liberation called yoga, meaning “union.” One such student, in the 6th century bce, was a young mendicant who came to be known as the Buddha. Three centuries after that, the teachings of yoga were compiled by Patanjali as the Yoga Sutras, and another two millennia later, the teachings of both Buddha and Patanjali have found a new home in the West. We asked a panel of people who practice both yoga and Buddhism how the two can work together.

Shambhala Sun: What would you say to one of the millions of Americans doing yoga who is interested in also practicing Buddhism? Why would you recommend…

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